First Rain of the Season for Southern California

By: Zachary Labe , 10:10 PM GMT on September 13, 2015

Zachary Labe
13 September 2015
http://sites.uci.edu/zlabe/blog/

A deepening trough will position itself across the western United States to start off the week. Remnants from Hurricane Linda will track eastward along the base of the trough and right entrance quadrant of the weak jet streak allowing for an ideal upslope flow of moisture into southern California.

While a temporary drying of the midlevels is allowing cooler conditions and a drop in dew points over California this afternoon, increased moisture will begin advecting over the region this evening in addition to a lower strato-cumulus cloud deck. Temperatures for most of the week will be below normal, but overnight lows will be mild in response to warm SST's and increased boundary layer moisture.

Showers will begin moving into the Los Angeles basin and San Bernardino Mountains during the day Monday and gradually sink southward by nightfall. PWATs will begin to increase to 1-2SD above normal and a westerly flow off the warm Pacific will aid in additional orographic lifting for the coastal mountains. Heavy rain will be possible at times toward Monday night across the higher elevations, particularly toward the Big Bear region. Slightly elevated instability may allow for a rumble of thunder at times and rain rates in excess of 0.3"/hr in any convection that forms. Showers will sink southward slowly overnight Monday.

Less forcing and some dry air around H925 along the coastal valleys will preclude heavier rain totals with QPF generally at or below 0.4" for most locations. Even lesser rain totals can be expected near San Diego and on southward.

Global and mesoscale models have been steadily decreasing total QPF from this event over the last few runs, and therefore, maximum totals will likely stay around 1.0-1.25 inches. Nevertheless, given the moist sounding and upslope flow, most areas will receive some rain for areas west of the mountains in southern California.The most widespread rain is expected in Orange, western Riverside/San Bernardino, and southern Los Angeles counties.

Most of California remains in an "exceptional drought" according to the latest U.S. Drought Monitor. While this rainfall will barely put a dent in the seasonal rain deficits, it is falling at a time that is normally dry across southern California.

Average September Rainfall:
-Irvine : 0.2"
-Los Angeles : 0.2"
-Pasadena: 0.4"
-San Diego : 0.2"

The rain also falls on the heels of some last week courtesy of monsoon moisture and afternoon convection that even moved along the coast of Orange County. This is a good sign for the upcoming winter as strong El Ninos often produce an active atmospheric river/pineapple express flow bringing excess rainfall to southern California. Both the CFS and ECMWF weeklies suggest above average precipitation is expected for the late September/early October time frame. For now, after this week's rain we can expected some increasing upper level heights and a return to a mild and slightly above normal temperature pattern by next weekend over southern California.


Lower Susquehanna Valley Doppler...

(Courtesy of WGAL)

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My Personal Research and Blog Website: http://sites.uci.edu/zlabe/


The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

Reader Comments

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67. jerseycityjoan
7:59 PM GMT on April 01, 2017
I remember when Blizz was still a junior in high school and how he'd have hundreds of posts from adults on his blog who followed his forecasts.

Now he's in graduate school and the blogs are ending.

I am sorry that Wunderground no long wants us to spend much time on its site. Obviously the plan is to offer less and make Wunderground.com a quick check-in place, not a destination for lingering and socializing.

I want to extend my thanks and best wishes to Blizz and the gang that made his blog a daily destination for me for years.


Good-Bye and Best of Luck to all.


Joan
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
66. listenerVT
12:20 AM GMT on March 20, 2017
Hallo Bloggers!

As you may know, the WU blogger blogs are going away on April 3rd. :-(

If you'd like to be able to blog after that, we're moving over to a Facebook group that is deemed a "secret group" ~ meaning no one can see it except members of the group (so no trolls)! If interested, send me a message on WU Mail or to my email address jschulte at together.net and I'll add you to the group.

One has to have or make a Facebook account, but if that makes you uncomfortable you can simply use your blog name and only use Facebook for this purpose. Just one idea.

I hope everyone here considers coming over to the FB group, because it's so much fun during blizzards and learning together. Anyway, it's easy to post photos and graphics there! In fact, Pcroton and Sully are letting us post their Twitter graphics and notes over there, so it's the best of both worlds. I hope to hear from Blizz. P doesn't do Facebook but Sully says he'll come over sometimes, so that will be awesome.

Fare thee well! Hoping to see you all pop up in my Inbox yet! :-) listenerVT

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
63. weathernewbie
7:38 PM GMT on February 08, 2017
Greetings from Princeton, Blizz!

Storm brewing here, but really miss checking in here to "See what Blizz says."

Will forward the link to your paper to a friend at the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies in the Global Systemic Risk group. They've been researching catastrophic agriculture failure. There's a team at Columbia University researching the topic as well.

Have you ever visited the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab? Wonder how you think it stacks up (in the weather department) to other similar facilities in the country.

Hope things continue to go well- and you check in here occasionally! And hope your family is doing well in Dauphin.
- Laura in PA and NJ

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
62. weathernewbie
6:23 PM GMT on February 08, 2017

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
61. Zachary Labe
6:28 PM GMT on August 31, 2016
For those looking for more information on my recent paper on changes in the onset of spring, Cornell released an article about it today. Check it out! Early-onset spring models may indicate 'nightmare' for ag
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
60. Zachary Labe
11:11 PM GMT on August 20, 2016
Hi everyone! For those interested, my research from undergraduate was just published in Climate Dynamics. You can find the paper here (open access): http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00382 -016-3313-2. It discusses changes in the timing of spring across the northern United States in addition to looking at anomalously early springs, like March 2012, going forward into the future.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
59. Zachary Labe
11:23 PM GMT on July 21, 2016
If anyone is interested, I am going to be a guest on the podcast, The Weather Junkies, this evening at 8pm. Feel free to watch if you would like! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vgT5P9zC91U&featu re=youtu.be
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
57. Zachary Labe
9:58 PM GMT on June 09, 2016
Quoting 56. Dabbio:

Dear Zachary,

Hoping that all has gone well with you through this school year. We really miss you, but look forward to learning more about your accomplishments as time goes by.

I had an inquiry from my son-in-law that I hoped might stimulate some DIM (Deep Inner Meaning) from you. I am doubtful of what his quote portends, as I know from your forecasts that there are a host of non-computed factors that you used in your amazingly accurate near term/meso-scale forecasts. Would appreciate any comment on what he sent me:

http://arstechnica.com/science/2016/06/with-iphon es-and-computer-models-do-we-still-need-weather-fo recasters/
Link
Quote:
"""
Numerical weather prediction improved dramatically, especially since
the 1970s. An analysis in Nature, published in 2015, found that
forecast skill in the 3- to 10- day range has increased by about one
day per decade. That is, a 6-day forecast today is as accurate as a
5-day forecast a decade ago. And this improvement shows no sign of
slowing down.
"""

IN particular, Zachary, I was doubtful because some of the important weather phenomena, such as how much storminess an actual front will stir up in the final minutes, or whether and where a particular tornado will form, seem all fairly unpredictable to me. We seem to be able to identify general conditions, but not particular events.

Kind regards,
David A. Burack


Hi Dabbio! Sorry for the late response. It is an interesting question that is getting a lot of attention in the meteorological field. While a sweeping generalization, I think there is an age element for the responses to this type of question in arguing the importance of humans in forecasting. Older generations support the constant need for humans in forecasting, while younger argue that computer model forecast skill is improving so dramatically that the need becomes a bit more hazy.

I argue a bit more in the later. We are seeing advances in both global models (coarse resolution, long-term predictions) and high resolution models (mesoscale processes, short-term predictions). We now have models that substantially improve simulations of convective events such as mesoscale convective systems or super cellular development. But there are certainly model errors. And another boundary in this debate is that computers can't really effectively communicate weather predictions like humans.

I think we are going to continue to see humans play more of a role in weather communication rather than forecasting. For the time being, yes, there is still a need for human interpretation and forecast skill, but I think it is beginning to wane. It is remarkable to see how accurate the high resolution, convectively-parameterized models can predict the location and timing of severe weather events... sometimes kinda scary-good.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
56. Dabbio
7:30 PM GMT on June 06, 2016
Dear Zachary,

Hoping that all has gone well with you through this school year. We really miss you, but look forward to learning more about your accomplishments as time goes by.

I had an inquiry from my son-in-law that I hoped might stimulate some DIM (Deep Inner Meaning) from you. I am doubtful of what his quote portends, as I know from your forecasts that there are a host of non-computed factors that you used in your amazingly accurate near term/meso-scale forecasts. Would appreciate any comment on what he sent me:

http://arstechnica.com/science/2016/06/with-iphon es-and-computer-models-do-we-still-need-weather-fo recasters/
Link
Quote:
"""
Numerical weather prediction improved dramatically, especially since
the 1970s. An analysis in Nature, published in 2015, found that
forecast skill in the 3- to 10- day range has increased by about one
day per decade. That is, a 6-day forecast today is as accurate as a
5-day forecast a decade ago. And this improvement shows no sign of
slowing down.
"""

IN particular, Zachary, I was doubtful because some of the important weather phenomena, such as how much storminess an actual front will stir up in the final minutes, or whether and where a particular tornado will form, seem all fairly unpredictable to me. We seem to be able to identify general conditions, but not particular events.

Kind regards,
David A. Burack
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
55. BaltimoreBrian
10:57 PM GMT on April 14, 2016
Congratulations on being cited in this Slate article!

Greenland's Ice Sheet Is Melting So Fast Right Now, Scientists Thought It Was an Error

Some followup from Neven:

Greenland under early pressure too Quote from the article:

** It seems 2012 saw an even earlier and more widespread melting event, although I'm not sure if this NSIDC graph (found here) can be compared directly to the DMI graph:

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
53. Zachary Labe
6:47 PM GMT on February 25, 2016
I posted this on my twitter earlier today, but wanted to share... pretty incredible disparity in snowfall across the Northeast this winter, particularly considering the January blizzard:
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
51. Astrometeor
4:38 AM GMT on January 24, 2016
Quoting 50. Blizzard92:

30.2" is the official storm total for Harrisburg, PA. It shattered the previous record of 25.0" from 1983. Incredible!


Phooey, grandparents got more than I did.

26.7" official at Millersville University.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
50. Zachary Labe
3:35 AM GMT on January 24, 2016
30.2" is the official storm total for Harrisburg, PA. It shattered the previous record of 25.0" from 1983. Incredible!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
49. Zachary Labe
2:47 AM GMT on January 24, 2016
Quoting 48. weathernewbie:

Hi Blizz, reporting in from Princeton, NJ. Will try to post pictures.
- Laura

Thank you! Enjoy the storm!!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
48. weathernewbie
11:51 PM GMT on January 23, 2016
Hi Blizz, reporting in from Princeton, NJ. Will try to post pictures.
- Laura
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
47. Zachary Labe
6:32 PM GMT on January 23, 2016
Quoting 46. Astrometeor:



I for one have never seen this amount of snow fall all at once. I've seen 3' deep snowpack, but that was already present when I arrived on site. There's snow piling up on my university window. Pretty low visibility, but the winds haven't been present as was forecast. But the snow is.

Wow, enjoy it! Sounds like an amazing storm for the Lower Susquehanna Valley with already two feet for most areas!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
46. Astrometeor
4:38 PM GMT on January 23, 2016
Quoting 45. Blizzard92:


Ah thank you! I surely am missing this one as it is now looking like potentially one of Harrisburg's largest snow storms on record. I miss the fun blogging days back in the winter of 2009-2010. Currently, I have my windows open here taking in the sea breeze haha.


I for one have never seen this amount of snow fall all at once. I've seen 3' deep snowpack, but that was already present when I arrived on site. There's snow piling up on my university window. Pretty low visibility, but the winds haven't been present as was forecast. But the snow is.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
45. Zachary Labe
7:47 AM GMT on January 23, 2016
Quoting 44. Hoynieva:

Although you don't have much time for blogging these days, it's nice to be able to check your twitter feed for the inevitable updates on our storm systems over here. I'm sure you wish you could have popped over just to be a part of this one. One day that may be possible.

This is looking like one for the record books for many parts of the mid-atlantic.

Be well, and enjoy the Cali life - doesn't get much better than that in this country, in my admittedly biased opinion.

Ah thank you! I surely am missing this one as it is now looking like potentially one of Harrisburg's largest snow storms on record. I miss the fun blogging days back in the winter of 2009-2010. Currently, I have my windows open here taking in the sea breeze haha.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
44. Hoynieva
5:13 AM GMT on January 23, 2016
Although you don't have much time for blogging these days, it's nice to be able to check your twitter feed for the inevitable updates on our storm systems over here. I'm sure you wish you could have popped over just to be a part of this one. One day that may be possible.

This is looking like one for the record books for many parts of the mid-atlantic.

Be well, and enjoy the Cali life - doesn't get much better than that in this country, in my admittedly biased opinion.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
43. Zachary Labe
3:46 AM GMT on January 13, 2016
Quoting 42. weathernewbie:

Happy New Year Zach!

A question from one of your early friends here... Can we still call a distinguished UC scholar "Blizz" around here?

Laura in Princeton, NJ (formerly from Bucks County, PA)

P.S. Maybe Princeton for a post doc?


Haha thank you! And yes, I think I will always like that name ;) I think I will be definitely coming back east for a postdoc; I miss my four seasons too much. I wish I had more time for blogs again on here... maybe one of these days. But for now most of my posts are on Twitter (@ZLabe) due to the short and sweet 140 character messages haha
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
42. weathernewbie
10:49 PM GMT on January 12, 2016
Happy New Year Zach!

A question from one of your early friends here... Can we still call a distinguished UC scholar "Blizz" around here?

Laura in Princeton, NJ (formerly from Bucks County, PA)

P.S. Maybe Princeton for a post doc?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
41. Zachary Labe
4:37 PM GMT on January 01, 2016
Happy New Year all! Hard to believe I started this blog way back in December 2007!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
40. originalLIT
6:22 PM GMT on December 25, 2015
Back to you, Zach!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
39. Zachary Labe
4:41 PM GMT on December 25, 2015
Merry Christmas everyone!
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38. Zachary Labe
6:40 PM GMT on November 26, 2015
Happy Thanksgiving everyone! One of these days soon I will get back to writing more haha! You can always follow me on twitter though for the latest: @ZLabe
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37. listenerVT
4:29 AM GMT on November 02, 2015
Quoting 35. Blizzard92:

Glad to see everyone having their first snow! 75F with the marine layer and low stratus here today haha.


We got snow here in NW VT on the 18th. Great fun!



Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
36. Zachary Labe
4:06 AM GMT on October 31, 2015
H everyone! I wanted to share this amazing tool a postdoc in my lab group has developed... Journals. This is a live feed that organizes topic genre and journal of atmospheric science and climate science periodicals by date released. It is really fantastic if you are looking for peer reviewed work on a certain topic. I recommend it for everyone!
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35. Zachary Labe
1:32 AM GMT on October 19, 2015
Glad to see everyone having their first snow! 75F with the marine layer and low stratus here today haha.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
34. Astrometeor
12:54 AM GMT on October 19, 2015
Had mid-upper 40s today with snow flurries melting as they fell today in Camp Hill, PA. On my fall break. :) Nice lake effect bands coming off the Lakes.
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33. TheRasberryPatch
6:20 PM GMT on October 18, 2015
42F and first snowflakes of snow hitting the ground, from lake effect
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32. Pcroton
5:33 PM GMT on October 17, 2015
the national weather service in mount holly, new jersey (phi) will lower its snowfall
criteria for winter storm watches/warnings and winter weather advisories in western
portions of chester county, pennsylvania (forecast zone paz101) for the upcoming 2015-
16 winter. the previous 12- (24-) hour snowfall criteria for a winter storm
watch/warnings in western chester county of 6 (8) inches will lower to 5 (7) inches for
the upcoming winter. similarly, the previous 12-hour snowfall criteria for a winter
weather advisory of 3 inches will lower to 2 inches in paz101.
the above changes to the western part of chester county allows for better inter-office
coordination with the national weather service forecast office in state college,
pennsylvania (ctp) and avoids public confusion across the eastern/western county zone
split in chester county. ctp, who is responsible for winter weather watches, warning
and advisories for the lower susquehanna region, has made the same criteria changes
effective this upcoming winter for lancaster county, the county that borders chester
county to the west




Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
31. Pcroton
8:26 PM GMT on October 16, 2015
Quoting 30. Blizzard92:


These are great points! I keep reading about people bashing those who don't include other signals/teleconnections into their winter forecasts. While yes important, this El Nino is entering such strong territory that its forcing is more likely to dominate the system in respect to other +ENSO events.


As we all know we never quite know what to expect until it's on our doorstep. I always feel that until late to mid December when you see the first winter jet setting up you're not entirely sure where to draw the frozen/non-frozen lines. Then the same goes for the second jet setup after the "january thaw".

That being said...it's very difficult to forecast against the probabilities that such a strong El Nino plays into. Let alone one of this caliber..of which has it's twin to the north. We don't know the effect of all the additional warmer water. When we see it we'll know.

But those saying toss El Nino out the window and forecast a cold snow North East - because it's happened before in El Nino years - apparently are either forgetting to, or purposely leaving out, that such an assumption is only plausible during weak to somewhat moderate events. Those, yeah, we can be a toss up out east. Anywhere from textbook to contradictory results.

But in strong events, let alone the "super" events if you will, the probability of textbook dominant pattern conditions out east are quite very high.

And then there's always the keyhole event, the one that sneaks into the pattern, like our 72hr cold snap this weekend. You never can forecast one of those. If one times just right this winter - it could produce a strong coastal snow storm - one of which would equal or exceed Mid-Atlantic seasonal snowfall averages in one fell swoop.

But that still to me wouldn't be verification of "toss el nino out of the winter discussion" if the rest of winter is 50s and bland. It's just an unforseen keyhole event. The "Hurricane Andrew" if you will.

As always with weather we'll see. And when we see we will adjust.
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30. Zachary Labe
2:54 PM GMT on October 14, 2015
Quoting 28. Pcroton:

Last two weeks, northern latitudes starting their cooling. Anomalies changing in the North Pacific. Bust the north pacific anomaly, bust the west ridge-east trough theory as a significant long duration pattern possibility out east (which is what the "throw el nino out the window, east coast will get a heavy winter") commentary of lunacy is all about.





These are great points! I keep reading about people bashing those who don't include other signals/teleconnections into their winter forecasts. While yes important, this El Nino is entering such strong territory that its forcing is more likely to dominate the system in respect to other +ENSO events.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
29. Pcroton
1:30 PM GMT on October 07, 2015
Quoting 25. Blizzard92:

Another failure for the American NWP modeling community; I will have more on this later. But for now, it definitely seems we were luckily spared along the East Coast from the hurricane.



The Euro did have the Mid-Atlantic capture scenario before any others and before it shifted to the east solution though. So it began the hysteria. Had it never shown that...then maybe we'd be able to really say it nailed it. It was the first to go right and be steady there I'll give it that but it wasn't flawless.

Also it's scores dumped as well during the period...likely tied to those few earlier runs (180hr-ish range) that showed the big Mid-Atlantic hit - while ironically all other models were out to sea in that short window.


Truly I think there's an issue in our observational data and data collection that's being fed into the models. Something has certainly changed and/or worsened over the past year or so. It's gotten far worse with guidance this past year. I think we're seeing a continued failure of observational networks and less balloon launches worldwide and it's taking it's toll. Failing buoys without repair, you name it.

Also the GFS Upgrade is a WORSE PERFORMING MODEL than the previous GFS it replaced in the last year. It's a joke.







...Here's the 2014 to 2015 SST Anomaly comparison. Some blowhards still trying to say El Nino isn't going to factor into the east coast winter weather. "I heard that last year" seems to be the common thread of ill science.




Yah, gee, identical! Can hardly tell the difference!

*sigh*

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28. Pcroton
2:01 PM GMT on October 04, 2015
Last two weeks, northern latitudes starting their cooling. Anomalies changing in the North Pacific. Bust the north pacific anomaly, bust the west ridge-east trough theory as a significant long duration pattern possibility out east (which is what the "throw el nino out the window, east coast will get a heavy winter") commentary of lunacy is all about.



Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
27. listenerVT
3:30 AM GMT on October 04, 2015
It is so good that the Carolinas didn't get a visit from Joaquin with all the rain pounding down there. The coast is spared the brunt of Joaquin, but there may be a lot of shoreline erosion. At least the coastal birds and animals tend to adjust well to a redesigned coastline. Humans find that hardest.
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26. TheRasberryPatch
1:58 AM GMT on October 02, 2015
Quoting 25. Blizzard92:

Another failure for the American NWP modeling community; I will have more on this later. But for now, it definitely seems we were luckily spared along the East Coast from the hurricane.


That is great news about the hurricane modeling East
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25. Zachary Labe
7:58 PM GMT on October 01, 2015
Another failure for the American NWP modeling community; I will have more on this later. But for now, it definitely seems we were luckily spared along the East Coast from the hurricane.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
24. TheRasberryPatch
7:10 PM GMT on September 30, 2015
1.56" of rain for yesterday, Blizz. It was mostly a steady rain by late afternoon/early evening. It got hard as the evening worn on.

Joaquin will be interesting. I heard maybe another Sandy track
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23. Zachary Labe
3:19 PM GMT on September 30, 2015
Family back home in Linglestown reporting 1.81" of rain from last night
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22. Zachary Labe
3:18 PM GMT on September 30, 2015
I have been posting a lot of my thoughts on Twitter due to time constraints for longer posts. But I am definitely favoring a more NC initial hit for Joaquin.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
21. Rittenhouse
12:36 PM GMT on September 30, 2015
Quoting 18. Pcroton:

Speaking of warm waters. What a difference a year makes. Great Lakes 10F or so warmer than this time last year. Not only does a strong El Nino portend a warm slushy I95 type winter but the Great Lakes being so warm kind of puts an extra inhibitor into play when trying to get arctic air into the coasts for even the keyhole snow events.




If we do get an arctic outbreak in November, looks like the Great Lakes are in for one heck of a lake effect event though.

Nice to see this blog being updated again, especially with Joaquin threatening the Northeast.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
20. Pcroton
4:40 PM GMT on September 28, 2015
Yeah, I was kinda shocked when I saw it too.


Please post 'em if you can find some good higher resolution anomaly maps for the Lakes.

I also wonder if this is going to lead to some impressive lake effect streamers beyond the usual time frames for those events.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
19. Zachary Labe
2:51 PM GMT on September 26, 2015
Oh wow, thanks for posting Pcroton! I didn't realize the great lakes warmed up so much relative to last year. I'll have to look up anomaly maps, but I imagine Erie and Ontario are well above normal.
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18. Pcroton
7:42 PM GMT on September 25, 2015
Speaking of warm waters. What a difference a year makes. Great Lakes 10F or so warmer than this time last year. Not only does a strong El Nino portend a warm slushy I95 type winter but the Great Lakes being so warm kind of puts an extra inhibitor into play when trying to get arctic air into the coasts for even the keyhole snow events.

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17. Zachary Labe
7:40 PM GMT on September 25, 2015
Our friends in Alaska are off to a cold start!
(Fairbanks -- 3-4" so far)
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Ph.D. Student - Earth System Science (UC Irvine), B.Sc. - Atmospheric Sciences (Cornell University)

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